THE TRANSSEXUAL PERSONS AND THE BRAIN

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Contents

  1. “Are you really trans?”: The Problem with Trans Brain Science | IJFAB Blog
  2. Structural Brain Differences for Transgender People
  3. Opening the lines of communication between research scientists and the wider community
  4. Researcher explores links between transgender brain and gender identity

  • Signs of gender dysphoria.
  • The Search for the ‘Transgender Brain’ Is Dangerous—and Dehumanizing;
  • Subscribe to our Mind & Brain newsletter.
  • Causes of transsexuality - Wikipedia.
  • Structural Brain Differences for Transgender People.

Figures, Tables, and Topics from this paper. Figures and Tables. Citations Publications citing this paper.

“Are you really trans?”: The Problem with Trans Brain Science | IJFAB Blog

What has sex got to do with it? The role of hormones in the transgender brain Hillary B. Neill Epperson.

Is it a Choice? - The Transgender Brain

Lechleitner , Prof. Machinskaya , Galina Alekseevna Sugrobova , O. References Publications referenced by this paper. Basel 15 Table 1.

Structural Brain Differences for Transgender People

Basel 17 Table 3. Results of morphometric analyses of the striatum for each of the groups. Should trans adults be worried? In that same paper, the researchers actually found mixed results for adolescents.


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They looked at nine brain regions each for trans girls and trans boys. Of those 18 regions, the researchers reported significant differences in only four out of 18 areas.

One area where trans girls differ from both cis girls and cis boys, two areas where trans girls are similar to cis girls, and one area where trans boys are similar to cis boys. What does this mixed bag suggest if we are to believe that trans brains must be similar to cis brains in order to be seen as legitimately transgender?

Opening the lines of communication between research scientists and the wider community

Not only does this interpretation put trans lives at the mercy of research outcomes, but it further ignores nonbinary trans people. If binary trans people must have brains that are similar to cis people of the same gender in order to be deemed valid, this necessarily invalidates the status of nonbinary trans people, unless their fate similarly hinges on having brain scans dissimilar to other groups. At the same time, it's unclear what those dissimilarities would be for nonbinary identities to count as valid.

Trans brain research and its recent coverage seek to measure trans people according to a cis standard — a standard that is itself a debunked fiction originally created by publication bias.

Researcher explores links between transgender brain and gender identity

The results showed that the volume of the brain region called the insula was smaller in both hemispheres for both groups of transgender women. The insula is important to body image, among other things. The size of the insula was not smaller in transgender women than in cisgender men, but its volume was reduced in transgender women compared to cisgender women. There are slight structural differences, which are far more subtle than the difference in genitals, for example. The researchers also stressed that reduced gray matter volume in a brain region does not necessarily mean the region in question contains fewer nerve cells.


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  • Structural Brain Differences for Transgender People.

Previous studies have found that sexual differentiation of the brain in transgender individuals does not accompany differentiation in the rest of the body. The insula plays a key role in body image and self-awareness. Autonomic control, homeostatic information and visceral sensations are processed within the central nervous system by the insula, for example.

The finding cannot be seen as indicating specificity, however.